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historic Harding cabin at Deer Creek

Historic Harding Cabin at Deer Creek offers a retreat-like setting with the convenience of home. Once a presidential hideaway, Harding Cabin shares a fascinating history. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, carefully restored to its original state and updated with modern conveniences, it is available for vacation rentals and business retreats. Our guests enjoy the cabin’s privacy, spacious living areas and richly appointed ambiance. To reserve the Harding Cabin, please call 800.282.7275.

Get ready for an even better Deer Creek!

Harding Cabin Features

  • Comfortably accommodates 8
  • Spacious living room
  • Sofa and two chairs pull out into beds
  • Gas fireplace
  • Television and DVD player
  • Oversized dining room with a table that seats 8
  • Full bathroom
  • Kitchen with electric range, refrigerator, dishwasher, microwave and toaster, plus dishes, cookware and utensils
  • Three bedrooms on the upper level
  • Washer/dryer
  • Full-length screened porch overlooking the 1,277-acre lake
  • Outside grill
  • Private boat dock
  • Housekeeping service is not available during your stay, but three sets of linens are provided for your use.

Harding Cabin History

The 1½-story cabin, known as “The Shack,” was constructed on the banks of Deer Creek by US Attorney General Harry M. Daugherty at the close of World War I. Daugherty was the strategist for Warren G. Harding during his state and national political campaigns and a cabinet member during the Marion newspaper publisher’s presidency. Harding was elected state senator (1899–1902), lieutenant governor (1903–1904) and US senator (1915–1921), before being elected President of the United States in 1921.

The cabin was reported to be a favorite retreat for Harding and his circle of close friends known in Washington as the “Ohio Gang” or “US Boys.” In addition, the hospitality of the cabin was reported to extend to supporters of the administration and those who wished to do business with it. The Harding Cabin found itself in the national limelight, revealed as a hideout after scandals were uncovered during and after Harding’s presidential term.

Perhaps the most well known of the scandals led to the conviction of Harding’s Secretary of the Interior, Albert B. Fall, on charges of accepting bribes in connection with leasing of federal oil reserves at Teapot Dome, Wyoming. The 29th President, whose personal integrity was never questioned, died August 2, 1923, in San Francisco while on a transcontinental tour.